John Noakes goes out with a Bang! Intrepid presenters’ final farewell

Even saying John Noakes’ name will bring a smile to your face if you are of certain age, what was one of the most loved  icons of 70s children’s TV. From climbing Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square to sky diving. If Blue Peter had a task that needing a bit of derring-do, then he was your man. And his ever faithful the sheep dog Shep never far from his side, the pair were inseparable. I seem to recall my dad buying ‘Get down Shep’ by the Baron Knight (but lets not go there).

John passed away in May and now his widow Vicky has chosen to fulfill his wishes which were to have half  of his ashes were scattered on his school playing field at Rishworth School, near Halifax, West Yorkshire and the other half to go to the island Majorca, where he spent his final years.

So a party of 25 gather on the sports field to see him off with a bang.  A fitting end for a man known for living life to the full.

Interesting to note that we wanted his ashes splitting ,which is becoming increasingly popular and that as he wanted his ashes to be scattered over his childhood sports pitch that his family added a fitting twist by using Self Fire Rocket Firework

I wonder if they considered Blue Peter’s Italian sunken garden as a location? Okay forget I suggested that.

Original stories and pictures: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5033861/Blue-Peter-legend-John-Noakes-ashes-blasted-sky.html#ixzz4xHpsL3Fj

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Celebrity ash scattering ceremony: David Gest

Celebrity ash scattering ceremony at Clifford’s Tower in York

David Gest TV impresario and ex husband of Liza Minnelli passed away in April this year and after a public funeral in Golders Green in London, his nearest and dearest decided that York would be the most appropriate place to scatter his ashes.

David loved the city and had said that was where he wished to die, he had even quipped that he wanted his ashes to be scattered outside a sandwich shop called the York Roast Company where he was a frequent visitor.

Instead the estate choose to scatter the ashes from the iconic Clifford’s Tower within the city. Imad Handi, David’s close friend and co-producer, explained: ‘He said that in his estate if he passed away he just wanted somewhere nice in York. We decided it was a peaceful place.’

The ceremony was small, in celebrity terms, around 20 close friends and family gathered. A pastor led a short service on the turret, which included a reading by David’s sister. The ashes were scattered over the grass below and then white doves and balloons were released.

Clifford’s Tower, which is managed by English Heritage was closed for the day to allow the service to take place. A spokesman for English Heritage, custodians of the tower, added: ‘We were approached by David Gest’s family who asked if they could scatter his ashes from the top of Clifford’s Tower in a small, private memorial.’, ‘As he was an adopted son of York, we thought it an appropriate thing to do for his family.’

Rather bizarrely the Mail interviewed the sandwich shop owner Wayne Chadwick who thought the ashes were coming his way and had assumed the scattering would take place at the shop, and was a little disappointed when they didn’t. He was quite philosophical, he is quoted as saying ‘I am a bit disappointed. But we don’t have any rights over what was to happen to the ashes and if his inner circle wanted to scatter them without any publicity I can understand that.

‘There were practical difficulties in disposing of the ashes in a land-locked shop so from a respect point of view I wanted to leave the final decision to David’s friends and family.’

This little story is quite revealing, what is pleasing for us is that the ashes ceremony was an important part of the farewell. The ceremony was more attuned to the deceased way of life, more celebratory, more unique, less funereal. The use of the clergy, doves and balloons all adding to the occasion. This is, as we say, a proper #4thceremony.

Finally I indulge myself  in the fantasy that Gest’s nearest and dearest found inspiration for the choice of location on the website. However, I do find the decision to close Clifford’s tower done for the day rather odd. I wonder whether English Heritage would do this for the likes of ordinary folk? They have certainly set a precedent, whether they were handsomely compensated in donation terms or just ‘free to those that can afford it, very expensive to those that can’t’. I wonder why they didn’t just have an evening service and close slightly early…?

Original story: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3612799/David-Gest-s-ashes-scattered-small-ceremony-adopted-home-city-York-20-close-friends-family-members-gather-say-final-goodbyes.html#ixzz4Atoc6dEH

#4thceremony #DavidGest #ashesscattering #York

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charges over ashes scattering

Charging for families to witness a scattering ceremony

Local Authorities are often at the sharp end of public anger when it comes to bereavement services, in extreme cases like the baby ashes scandal at Morten Hall or issues around removal of memorial items from a grave plot.

I tend not to be partisan on behalf of the public, councils often have a difficult path to tread, particularly with increasing financial pressure. But, when they do cross a line in this area it is woeful, they seem insensitive, greedy and intransigent.

Sadly, this would seem to be the case here. The family of the late Peter Robert Dale were told that if that if they wanted to witness the scattering of ashes at Wakefield Crematoria in Yorkshire, they would need to pay £70 for the privilege.

Wakefield Council had started charging the £70 fee at the Standbridge Lane crematorium last year (2015).

The family considered this to be abhorrent, Mr Dale’s family had already paid several thousand of pounds for his funeral. Then hundreds more for a book of remembrance entry and bronze plaque at the crematorium in Crigglestone. Now they are being asked to pay this fee which they think is unjustified (and I tend to agree).

Three years has gone since Mr Dale’s passing and his wife Betty considered that the scattering the ashes on the anniversary of his death would be appropriate. So they spoke to the crematorium to arrange this it was then they were told they must either pay £70 – or hand the ashes over to crematorium staff to scatter in private for free, as Mr Dale’s son Jason described it “when they got the chance”.

Jason went on to say “It should be the bereaved’s God given right to be there at the last goodbye free of charge, or at most with the cost included as part of the cremation fee like it used to be. It is unfair to those on limited incomes, frankly it is downright disrespectful.”

I find myself agreeing with Mr Dale. I understand the Local Authorities face financial pressure; I understand that they need to find new ways to generate income streams. However this has to be sensitive and proportionate. And this approach is neither.

One can presume, but not know, the authority thought – well if it takes x amount time out of an ordinary day to accommodate a family’s wishes, then we should be able to recoup that. One I would argue £70 is excessive, I would guess that they had arrived at the figure by some magical formula adding hourly rates to ‘on costs’ and transaction fees – but they have lost the point. The Authority are holding a family to ransom here, not only would people quite rightly think this comes as part of the deal but the actual cost appears disproportionate to the effort require.

I would argue that the additional effort should be rolled in the cremation fee which would mean a very negligible increase.

The other option would be for the authority to say when they will scatter, eg “we carry out scatterings on Friday mornings 10 -12, your ashes will be scattered around 11am, should you wish to attend”

So Local Authorities, PLEASE, think then think again when you make such decisions as they can lead to a lot of ill feeling.

 

Original story: http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/charges-over-ashes-scattering-1-7870221#ixzz47lnlegmg

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ashes cremation water urn

Handmade Biodegradable Water Urns

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Biodegradable water urns handmade, handpainted and completely bespoke.

Our talented artist Ann hand makes these amazing urns using a papier-mâché technique gradually building up the shape and then hand painting it with exquisite designs. You can choose from a range of different ideas: for the classic English lady or gent what about a teapot urn, for the avid traveller there is a suitcase urn, you can choose five luggage ‘stickers’ with your loved one’s favourite travel destinations as well as a luggage label with their name on; a flat-cap for a Yorkshireman; or a ketch for the keen sailor?

These 100% biodegradable water urns can hold a full set of ashes and be cast into the sea for a truly memorable water burial, they will break down gently releasing your loved one’s ashes into the water. Or, you can display them proudly in your home without anyone having a clue what’s inside, it’s up to you.

The materials she uses are carefully selected to be perfect for green funerals. They are toxin free, organic & compostable. Over time they break down naturally in earth & water, without causing environmental harm. She chooses materials with care – unbleached recycled paper, print-free recycled packaging & VOC free PVA & wallpaper paste, both non-toxic. Sometimes other natural materials are added in (e.g. powdered chalk, linseed oil).

The decorative finishes are also kind to the environment: plant based (cotton, sisal, leaves, flowers…) or even mineral (sand, tiny pebbles, clay…). For colour work,she prefers casein paint & earth colours.

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sky helicopter ashes

Scattering Ashes – Radio Controlled Helicopter: Yorkshire and beyond

If you want a send off with a difference. Something a bit special, then consider a aerial dispersal with the aid of a highly modified radio controlled helicopter.

Your loved one is elevated making a 360 degree viewing over their favourite place before taking a last look at friends and family before climbing away. At an acceptable altitude the ashes are slowly released across the sky forming a long swirling cloud before disappearing completely in what can be described as a highly charged emotional experience.

Flights can take place from just about anywhere and in most weathers. A video example is below the contact form.

Based in south Yorkshire, and available around the UK

Costs:

1 – For the service to be performed within a 50 miles radius of my home address in Rotherham – £100

2 – additional mileage charged each way – £0.25 per mile

3 – Additional flight on the same day and location  –  £25.00

4 – Locations greater than 150 miles from Rotherham will incur an overnight stay at basic costs  – Cost on application

Note: cost correct at the time of publication.

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A 6ft dinosaur, 600 umbrellas and a casket of ashes

All left First TransPennine trains – umbrellas, well indeed I think all of us have done that at least once. The ashes slightly strange. I suppose if you put them on the seat beside you and then jump off in a bit of a rush its possible. However the odd part here is it would appear to be one of the unclaimed items…

Will Munton, First TransPennine Express’ Huddersfield Station Manager, said: “We deal with over 6,000 items of lost property every year including a number of more unusual finds, averaging more than 18 misplaced items every single day.

“As we cover such a large regional spread, we expect to find some strange items when clearing out the unclaimed lost and found, however this year has really opened our eyes to the unusual. Luckily, we’re able to return a large amount of lost goods to their rightful owners, and we were thankful to return the casket in question to its loved one.”

You never know it might have been part of the loved one’s last wishes, train spotters and enthusiasts have some peculiar ideas of what constitutes ‘fun’…

http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/cremation-casket-full-ashes-among-9554776

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cremation ashes policy hull

Come on the Tigers: Hull City FCs policy on scattering ashes at the KC Stadium

cremation ashes policy hull

Hull City FC, known affectionately as the the Tigers, a have good positive policy on scattering of ashes at the club. They allow ashes to be scattered at the KC stadium. They informed us of the following:

The ashes are normally scattered on a weekday as long as they don’t have any matches that day. 

Please liaise with Dave Gregory on david.gregory@hulltigers.com he will be able to help you [note things change, so if you come to contact Mr Gregory and he has changed jobs here is the club’s central email address –  info@hulltigers.com]

 Ordinarily they would require the following information:

  • Preferred date – if you could give two or three dates that would be ideal
  • Whether the deceased was a Hull City or Hull FC supporter
  • How many people are attending

The ashes scatterings take place between 2pm – 3pm.

So whether football or rugby – you are well looked after.

 

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Two of true heroes brought together and buried side by side after 72 years

I loved this story; there is something of the schoolboy, something of the epic, and a completeness about it.

This story is about the explorer Frank Wild finally having his ashes laid to rest. He accompanied the Anglo-Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton on four adventures to Antarctica as his second in commend – Shackleton described him as his “other self”. Last week after 72 years the ashes of Wild were finally interred next to Shackleton as had been his last wish after he passed away in 1939.

The story and final journey had wonderful undertones of the two men’s great journeys early last centaury. The Yorkshireman, Frank Wild, had served as Shackleton number two on their famous attempted first land crossing of Antarctica whilst aboard the ship Endurance and later taking control of the expedition on which Shackleton died.

After the Wild’s death aged 66, in South Africa in August 1939, he was cremated in order that he could have his final wish – to be buried alongside his comrade on the island of South Georgia in the South Atlantic. Then within a fortnight of his cremation the Second World War erupted and it looked like Wild’s last wish was to remain unfulfilled.

All this changed after 2002 when the author Angie Butler researching her new book ‘The Quest for Frank Wild’ began to investigate where his cremated remains might be. The search lead her to the urn located in a disused vault under the chapel at Braamfontein Cemetery in Johannesburg.
The decision was made to fulfil Wild’s last wish and so the ashes were taken to Argentina, then onto South Georgia accompanied by six of his relatives, the Hon Alexandra Shackleton (the explorer’s granddaughter) and Ms Butler.

Shackleton’s wife had requested that he was buried at Grytviken in South Georgia after suffering a fatal heart attack whilst on expedition down there.

The ceremony to inter Wild’s ashes was conducted by Reverend Richard Hines, who had travelled from the Falkland Islands. The cremation urn was carried by his family and the Poem “Sea Fever” by John Masefield (what a great poem! as I know many of look to find suitable words for such an occasion and this poem is spell binding, I shall put it in a separate post). The family made readings and a headstone was erected to mark his last resting place.

I can’t add much to this very well written article from the Telegraph, just to say that it was a wonderful thing to do for all concerned, I could waffle on about making sure you record events and letting people know you final wishes, but that would take it away the story – one respect, honour and determination.
For a more complete story follow the link to the Telegraph. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/antarctica/8918916/Explorers-ashes-finally-laid-to-rest-next-to-Sir-Ernest-Shackleton.html

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Fitting farewell to an old soldier: a paratroopers ashes scattered over Arnhem in Holland.

This is a great story of paratrooper, veteran of WWII and subsequent conflicts, having his ashes scattered at the site of one of the famous locations in airborne military history.

Ernest Venus passed away earlier this year and his daughter Joan Venus Evans thought it would be a fitting tribute to have his ashes parachuted down and scattered over Arnhem. Lance Corporal Chris Duggan, of Hull TA unit, 299 (Parachute Squadron) Royal Engineers, volunteered to jump out of an aircraft, carrying Mr Venus’s ashes.

The Dutch town of Arnhem in the Netherlands and its Bridge were considered to be key strategic objectives in the closing stages of the war. Operation Market Garden as it was known was later immortalised in the classic war film A Bridge Too Far (Arnhem being that Bridge)

Mr Venus joined the East Yorkshire Regiment in 1940 and qualified as a military parachutist in December 1941. He rejoined the army soon after being de-mobbed and served in the unit the late 1960s, reaching the rank of staff sergeant.

Mrs Venus-Evans said funeral director Mark Horton gave her the idea of having her father’s ashes scattered from the air. Air the Regiment were there to help for an old comrade.

Once Lance Corporal Duggan completed the task, Mr Venus’s family held their own tribute in west Hull.

Mrs Venus-Evans said: “I had a text from Major Wilcock to say the ashes had been released over the drop zone in Arnhem.

“We went outside and set some rockets off. It was more emotional than the funeral.”

Lance Corporal Duggan said he was honoured to have carried out the task on behalf of his regiment.

He said: “It was an incredible experience for me to be parachuting into Arnhem, let alone have the honour of scattering the ashes of a former member of the Squadron onto the drop zone.”

This story is exactly what we hope to say on the website – celebrate, make it memorable, make it your own and if possible remember with a smile. The article has a lovely quote from Mrs Venus Evans: “Dad was never happier than when he was on manoeuvres or parachuting. “It could not have been more fitting. Anyone who knew Dad would know he would be laughing his head off.”

http://www.thisishullandeastriding.co.uk/bridge-far-ashes-war-veteran-scattered-Arnhem/story-13371456-detail/story.html

 

 

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hassle ashes

Burying cremation ashes at a family grave: frustrated by regulation and red tape

A lady from North Yorkshire has discovered the large amount of redtape and hurdles needed have her casket (cremation urn) buried at a family grave, and she has said that if it can’t be done legally then she would do it illegally.

Mrs Rea wants to have her ashes buried in the same grave as her grandparents. However the local authority has said that she needs permission from all the next-of-kin. And as these are grandparents this includes all her cousins, some of whom she no longer has any contact with.

One can easily see how this can be exacerbated by modern society – dispersed families, divorces and step families.

Mrs Rea, who planned to have her ashes put in her grandparents’ grave in Thornaby Cemetery, Thornaby, near Stockton, said: “My grandfather was a funeral director in Yarm, so I should have been aware of these issues.”

“It must be so emotional for some families who just want to have their mother’s or father’s ashes buried in a family grave, having to contact everyone in their family.

She doesn’t want to ask in case one of them says no then this would cause a big family argument.

Stockton Borough Council are sympathetic, but point out there are six other people with an equal claim to be buried there.

Mrs Rae said: “I’ve said to my family, I don’t want all this legal fuss, just bury my ashes in the grave in secret when no one is looking. It just means I can’t have my name on the gravestone, which is sad.”

Interesting, you can appreciate the poor woman’s predicament, although the local authority does have a point. There does seem like no obvious solution… scattering maybe? But people tend to feel quite strongly about burying or scattering. I wonder if the local authority would have a similar view if she scattered as no actual capacity would be used and thus could she have her name on the headstone…?

If she did chose to do it illegally and one of the family reported this to the authority – would they have a duty to exhume the ashes?!

Also thinking about how would you do it surreptitiously, I don’t envy the family member who gets that job!

How interesting or helpful is this page? 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 4.20 out of 5)
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www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/9154252.Please_scatter_my_ashes_illegally/

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scattering ashes north yorkshire

Whitby North Yorkshire: North East Coast

 

Location Whitby, North Yorkshire
Area of operation Whitby and nearby areas
Type of boat Bullet DS38 Islander
Duration of trip Can be tailored to your requirements
Capacity of boat Capacity is 12 with seating for 8 passengers
Refreshments  NA
Additional info The boat is warm, safe and comfortable. Weather permitting, ashes may be scattered all year round.
Suitable urn Scattering ashes directly onto the water can lead to them being blown about which some families may find distressing. We supply a wide range of urns specifically designed for water ceremonies. They are all 100% biodegradable and will dissolve in water – please follow the link: Water Urns

We also supply a water ceremony set which includes a water urn, flower petals for scattering, Promises – dissolvable notelets for scattering with the ashes, a certificate to record the ceremony, and our award winning (and rated 5* on Amazon) guide book: follow the link – 4th Ceremony Set

Cost From £120 for scattering in the bay, more if you need to go further afield
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To make an enquiry please fill in the form below with your preferred date and number of people attending the scattering, please make sure you include a contact number as the boat company will call you directly to discuss your requirements, you will receive an automated reply with the contact number for you to call if your enquiry is urgent:

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bridlington boat scattering ashes

Bridlington, Yorkshire : North East Coast

 

Location  Bridlington, Yorkshire
Area of operation Bridlington Bay as far south as Hornsea and north as far as Filey Bay including Flamborough Head and Bempton
Type of boat  40 foot traditional wooden boat fully licensed and insured with plenty of seating.
Duration of trip  Usually an hour, but all trips can be tailored to your requirements up to a maximum of 6 hours.
Capacity of boat  12 passengers and 2 crew with ample seating.
Refreshments  na
Additional info  All trips are carried out in a caring and sensitive manner. If you have any specific requirements please don’t hesitate to contact me.
Providing the weather is favourable we can scatter ashes all year round.
Suitable urn Scattering ashes directly onto the water can lead to them being blown about which some families may find distressing. We supply a wide range of urns specifically designed for water ceremonies. They are all 100% biodegradable and will dissolve in water – please follow the link: Water Urns

We also supply a water ceremony set which includes a water urn, flower petals for scattering, Promises – dissolvable notelets for scattering with the ashes, a certificate to record the ceremony, and our award winning (and rated 5* on Amazon) guide book: follow the link – 4th Ceremony Set

Cost  Prices start from £100 for Bridlington Bay and increase depending on the length of trip and how far you want to go.
Parking  Parking is available at both the harbour and council car parks approx 100 yards from the boat.
Toilets are available at the top of the council car park across the road. There are also toilets 40 yards from where you board the boat.
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To make an enquiry please fill in the form below with your preferred date and number of people attending the scattering, please make sure you include a contact number as the boat company will call you directly to discuss your requirements:

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Do you need us to supply a water urns ? These are an additional cost to the boat and we will contact separately about these.

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Scarborough boat for scattering ashes

Scarborough: Yorkshire Coast

Location Scarborough
Area of operation 20 Nautical Miles from Any Port
Type of boat  10.5m Carvel Built 
Duration of trip  Can be tailored to your requirements and up to 4 hours 
Capacity of boat Capacity of boat 12 and plenty of seating
Refreshments Can be arranged.
Additional info Toilet on board. The boat is safe and comfortable. Providing the weather is favourable they can scatter ashes all year round
Suitable urn Scattering ashes directly onto the water can lead to them being blown about which some families may find distressing. We supply a wide range of urns specifically designed for water ceremonies. They are all 100% biodegradable and will dissolve in water – please follow the link: Water Urns

We also supply a water ceremony set which includes a water urn, flower petals for scattering, Promises – dissolvable notelets for scattering with the ashes, a certificate to record the ceremony, and our award winning (and rated 5* on Amazon) guide book: follow the link – 4th Ceremony Set

Cost Prices start from £60 for the full Boat for a ½ Hour Trip
Disabled access Unfortunately they can’t offer disabled access to wheelchairs as it is difficult to get a wheelchair onto the boat. 
Parking Their is several pay and display car parks around the slipway which Scarborough council run. and opposite the slipway are several all day disabled bays for parking.

To make an enquiry please fill in the form below with your preferred date and number of people attending the scattering, please make sure you include a contact number as the boat company will directly to discuss your requirements:

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