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cremation ashes river nsw

Experiences from Australia: by a river where mum was raised

Full credit goes to Beverley Hadgraft the author of the original article in the Australian daily Telegraph.

In the original article there were four different voices from four different experiences I have put a link at the bottom if you wish to see the article in full. I have split it down for people as each has an entirely separate rationale and make it easier to comment on and search for.

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We scattered my mum’s ashes by the river where she was raised Penny McKee, 44.

“My mum Pam was always clear about where she wanted her ashes scattered: by the river in Gloucester, NSW, where she was raised. It was where her mother’s ashes were as well. We spoke to the people living on the property and told them how my grandmother had built it and they kindly gave us access. I guess they enjoyed the exchange of history.

“We chose Mum’s birthday in March to scatter her ashes. We put them in a Crabtree and Evelyn box, then walked from the house to the river, a familiar route we’d often taken as children, only now we were there with our own children. It was very spiritual. We were looking at trees that had been there in our childhoods and Mum’s childhood too, so it was very connecting.

“We four siblings scattered some ashes and then each of our children scattered some as well. ‘There you go, Mum. Back to where you came from,’ we said.

“At 11am, we had coffee and cake because that was a favourite ritual of Mum’s. Finally, we went to the cemetery where Mum’s twin brother was buried and put some ashes on his grave because she’d wanted that as well.
“As a celebrant, I know lots of people don’t know what to do about ashes, but I think it helps to start by coming up with a significant date. The bereaved feel much better if ashes aren’t just left in a cupboard. We felt blessed being able to do what Mum had wanted.”

I really liked this, it is clear that Mrs McKee has considered her actions where there is lots of symbolism with the returning to the start and personal rituals with the tea and cakes, she also separates some to go with the brother. I also agree with her that choosing a poignant date good start.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/what-i-did-with-a-loved-ones-ashes/story-fnejo9jl-1226474398619

 

Experiences from Australia: by a river where mum was raised

 

Full credit goes to Beverley Hadgraft the author of the original article in the Australian daily Telegraph.

In the original article there were four different voices from four different experiences I have put a link at the bottom if you wish to see the article in full. I have split it down for people as each has an entirely separate rationale and make it easier to comment on and search for.

.

We scattered my mum’s ashes by the river where she was raised Penny McKee, 44.

“My mum Pam was always clear about where she wanted her ashes scattered: by the river in Gloucester, NSW, where she was raised. It was where her mother’s ashes were as well. We spoke to the people living on the property and told them how my grandmother had built it and they kindly gave us access. I guess they enjoyed the exchange of history.

“We chose Mum’s birthday in March to scatter her ashes. We put them in a Crabtree and Evelyn box, then walked from the house to the river, a familiar route we’d often taken as children, only now we were there with our own children. It was very spiritual. We were looking at trees that had been there in our childhoods and Mum’s childhood too, so it was very connecting.

“We four siblings scattered some ashes and then each of our children scattered some as well. ‘There you go, Mum. Back to where you came from,’ we said.

“At 11am, we had coffee and cake because that was a favourite ritual of Mum’s. Finally, we went to the cemetery where Mum’s twin brother was buried and put some ashes on his grave because she’d wanted that as well.
“As a celebrant, I know lots of people don’t know what to do about ashes, but I think it helps to start by coming up with a significant date. The bereaved feel much better if ashes aren’t just left in a cupboard. We felt blessed being able to do what Mum had wanted.”

I really liked this, it is clear that Mrs McKee has considered her actions where there is lots of symbolism with the returning to the start and personal rituals with the tea and cakes, she also separates some to go with the brother. I also agree with her that choosing a poignant date good start.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/what-i-did-with-a-loved-ones-ashes/story-fnejo9jl-1226474398619

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